Barbara Babcock’s memoir Fish Raincoats recounts a woman lawyer’s “firsts”

The life and times of a trailblazing feminist in American law. The first female Stanford law professor was also first director of the District of Columbia Public Defender Service, one of the first women to be an Assistant Attorney General of the United States, and the biographer of California’s first woman lawyer, Clara Foltz. Survivor, [...]

Full Story »

Thorsten Sellin’s Slavery and the Penal System is Digitally Remastered:™ Shows history of using slave labor as criminal sentence, invention of the treadmill

The classic and groundbreaking study of penal slavery throughout the ages is finally available again. Previously a rare book — despite the fact that it is widely quoted and cited by scholars in the field of sociology, penology, and criminology — this book can now be accessed easily worldwide and be assigned again to classes.
Now in its [...]

Full Story »

Yale Law Journal, April ‘16: Administrative Forbearance, and The New Public

This issue of the Yale Law Journal (the sixth issue of academic year 2015-2016) features articles and essays by notable scholars, as well as extensive student research. The issue’s contents include:
• Article, “Administrative Forbearance,” by Daniel T. Deacon
• Essay, “The New Public,” by Sarah A. Seo
The student contributions are:
• Note, “How To Trim a Christmas Tree: Beyond Severability [...]

Full Story »

Yale Law Journal, March ‘16: Municipal bankruptcy, professional speech, insider trading, and reproductive rights

This issue of the Yale Law Journal (the fifth issue of academic year 2015-2016) features articles and essays by notable scholars, as well as extensive student research. Contents include:
• “Governance Reform and the Judicial Role in Municipal Bankruptcy,” by Clayton P. Gillette & David A. Skeel, Jr.
• “Professional Speech,” by Claudia E. Haupt
• “Casey and [...]

Full Story »

Yale Law Journal, Feb. 2016: History of patent cases’ explosion, 4th Amendment issues of ‘effects,’ and tributes to Robert A. Burt

The February issue of the Yale Law Journal features articles and essays by notable scholars, as well as extensive student research. The issue is dedicated to the memory of Professor Robert A. Burt, with essays in his honor by Robert Post, Owen Fiss, Monroe Price, Martha Minow, Martin Boehmer, Anthony Kronman, Frank Iacobucci, and Andrew [...]

Full Story »

Harvard Law Review, #1 for 2015-2016: The Supreme Court, 2014 Term, Has Case Summaries; Essays by Strauss, Gluck, Goldsmith and Yoshino

The November issue is the special annual review of the U.S. Supreme Court’s previous Term. Each year, the issue is introduced by noteworthy and extensive contributions from recognized scholars. In this issue, for the 2014 Term, articles include:
* Foreword: “Does the Constitution Mean What It Says?,” by David A. Strauss
* Comment: “Imperfect Statutes, Imperfect Courts: [...]

Full Story »

Lawrence Friedman’s novel Dead in the Park has Frank May tracking down his link to a corpse

Frank May is a private practice lawyer in San Mateo, California, and he doesn’t want to get involved with an unidentified dead body in the park. So why is he involved with an unidentified dead body in the park? The man was found in a neighboring California town with no identification; all the police found [...]

Full Story »

Buddy Ward’s novel Brave West Wind takes Steamer Causey from the Bahamas to Danger

Storms destroy things and leave their marks forever. Captain Steamer Causey–a charter boat captain on one of the finest boats in all the Bahamas–thought he had his life all arranged and had put his past far behind him. He did not look for, and did not see, the signs of the storms building all about [...]

Full Story »

Lawrence Friedman’s novel Death of a Schemer pits Frank May against a house full of suspects

Frank May, the lawyer who’s a reluctant detective, takes on the mystery of a house full of characters and and secrets. Frank’s law office is in San Mateo, California, his practice often dealing with wills and estates. Dead clients are an essential part of an estates practice, but these are, for almost everybody, quite natural [...]

Full Story »

Walter Murphy’s bestselling novel The Vicar of Christ is Digitally Remastered™ and available again: explores the Supreme Court and Vatican politics

The New York Times Bestseller is now available in modern digital formats, featuring a new Foreword by Justice Samuel Alito, as well as a new paperback and hardcover. This book has universally been considered an unusual, fascinating, and well-written observation of the life of a man who was first a war hero and Medal of [...]

Full Story »

Eliezer Segal’s new collection of fun, informative essays on the Jewish calendar: A Time for Every Purpose

A Time for Every Purpose continues the series of collections of Eliezer Segal’s beloved and witty articles about the Jewish sacred calendar — articles that originally appeared in his From the Sources column in the Calgary Jewish Free Press between 2011 and 2015. As always, the author strives to maintain [...]

Full Story »

Yale Law Journal, Apr. 2015, on constitutional duty to supervise, discrimination by architectural design, and AG nondefense of laws

The contents of the April 2015 issue (Volume 124, Number 6) are:
• Article, “The Constitutional Duty To Supervise,” by Gillian E. Metzger
• Article, “Architectural Exclusion: Discrimination and Segregation Through Physical Design of the Built Environment,” by Sarah Schindler
• Feature, “Fifty Attorneys General, and Fifty Approaches to the Duty To Defend,” by Neal Devins & Saikrishna [...]

Full Story »

Crump’s fictional lawyer Robert Herrick is Back: Suing Terrorists and their Money Machine

The football game is tied. It’s in sudden death overtime. And that’s when three Islamic extremists trigger an explosion that kills over 100 innocent spectators. The men who did it are promptly caught and charged with capital murder, but everyone knows that there are more guilty people behind the act. There are banks, or foundations, [...]

Full Story »

I Saw Them Die: historical and occasionally bizarre account from a WWI nurse

Shirley Millard’s harrowing and fascinating account of her MASH-like experience in WWI France gives insights she intends and many more that she does not. Reading it is an experience on several levels. One of the most fascinating personal accounts of the Great War from just behind the lines, first published in 1936, and updated by Prof. Elizabeth Townsend Gard.

Full Story »

Book Club Questions for Aviva Orenstein’s 2016 novel Fat Chance

The main information page for this book is found here.
This page is dedicated to questions and themes raised by the novel, suggested for classroom use and, especially, book clubs. For more information and interaction with the author, contact Aviva at aorenste [at] indiana [dot] edu.
Discussion Questions for Fat Chance
1. Claire struggles with her weight and [...]

Full Story »

Cicero’s On Old Age is adapted and illustrated for today’s reader, with commentary and humor

Richard Gerberding, retired Professor of History and Director of Classical Studies at Alabama-Huntsville, adapts On Old Age for a new generation of readers. Illustrator Lance Rossi of Salem, Oregon, contributes over 60 clever drawings and sketches. The Wall Street Journal named it one of the year’s six “Best Books on Making the Most of Later [...]

Full Story »

Costigan’s new novel The Rat-Taker is a mystery and period piece, of plague and 1300s London

Set in 14th Century London during the time of the Great Pestilence, THE RAT-TAKER is about an obsessive love and a tragic event coiled into one mystery.

Simon the Rat-Taker, or, as he came to called, Simon Ratiker, is a man obsessed by a terrible event that he cannot wholly remember. Driven by the question, “What did happen?” Simon attempts to recall the truth by dictating to his scribe the events of the day that became the cross point of his life: “the day the rats began to die.”

Full Story »

Jay Jacobs’ novel-like The Widow Wave offers exciting account of wrongful death trial from shipwreck

Will anyone ever know what happened to the Aloha, a sport fishing boat that vanished with all onboard in the Pacific off San Francisco’s coast? ‘Knowing’ may be a complex, inexact business. There’s real truth and then there’s courtroom truth; a jury’s verdict may or may not approach what actually happened. Nor can someone reading about [...]

Full Story »

Selznick’s The Organizational Weapon is Digitally Remastered, adding extensive new foreword by Martin Krygier

The Organizational Weapon is a classic study of the methods, propaganda, and institutions which create infiltration and eventually cooptation of organizations from within. The study applies its theory to communist techniques, but its analysis and insights have, over the years, become extremely useful in identifying and combating such methods in [...]

Full Story »

Hirsch’s enduring The Enigma of Felix Frankfurter explores the contradictions of the influential jurist

A recognized, fascinating, and much-cited classic of judicial biography and Supreme Court insight is now available in a quality ebook edition—featuring active contents, linked notes, proper formatting, and a fully-linked Index—as well as a new paperback reprint edition.
Felix Frankfurter was perhaps the most influential jurist of the 20th century—and one of the most complex men [...]

Full Story »

Herzl’s impactful The Jewish State, calling for a new Israel in 1896, adds 2014 Foreword by Jerold Auerbach

Few books have changed human history as did Theodor Herzl’s 1896 tract advocating the founding—even the inevitability—of a Jewish state. The new edition from Quid Pro Books (in paperback, hardcover, and digital formats) adds a 2014 Foreword by Jerold S. Auerbach, Professor Emeritus of History at Wellesley College and recognized as a leading scholar in [...]

Full Story »

The Landis Report to Kennedy on Regulatory Reform Joins Legal Legends Series, in Print and eBooks

James Landis’ hard-to-find but much-cited Report to Sen. John Kennedy’s committee on administrative regulation and commissions is now readily and affordably available as an ebook or new paperback. Sold out or “unavailable” with major booksellers despite its frequent use in academic literature, the Report finds its new home in the Legal Legends Series.
In 1960, James [...]

Full Story »

Yale Law Journal Symposium on Modern Civil Rights Law & Theory Honors, or Challenges, Bruce Ackerman

“Symposium: The Meaning of the Civil Rights Revolution” (Vol. 123, No. 8, June 2014) is, in effect, a new and extensive book of contemporary thought on civil rights, written by today’s leading voices on constitutional law. In February 2014, Yale Law Journal held a symposium marking the 50th anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of [...]

Full Story »

University of Chicago Law Review, #2 of 2014, explores scientific evidence, regulatory agencies, habeas, and disability law

The second issue of 2014 features articles and essays from recognized scholars. Contents include these articles:
• “Group to Individual (G2i) Inference in Scientific Expert Testimony,” David L. Faigman, John Monahan & Christopher Slobogin
• “Game Theory and the Structure of Administrative Law,” Yehonatan Givati
• “Habeas and the Roberts Court,” Aziz Z. Huq
• “Cost-Benefit Analysis and Agency [...]

Full Story »

Harvard Law Review, #8, June 2014, Features Symposium on Freedom of the Press; plus Public Trials and Judicial Behavior

Harvard Law Review, Number 8 (June 2014), includes an extensive Symposium on Freedom of the Press, as well as an article, “The Criminal Court Audience in a Post-Trial World,” by Jocelyn Simonson, and a book review essay, “The Positive Foundations of Formalism: False Necessity and American Legal Realism,” by Lawrence B. Solum (reviewing Epstein, Landes, [...]

Full Story »

Jerold Auerbach explores Israeli legitimacy in his 2014 book Jewish State, Pariah Nation

Jewish statehood was restored in 1948 amid a struggle over legitimacy that has persisted in Israel ever since: Who rules? Who decides? Antagonism between the political left and right erupted into bloody violence over the Altalena. Secular-religious discord even made defining who is a Jew in a Jewish state contentious.
After the Six-Day War, the return [...]

Full Story »

Walter Murphy’s novels of World War II espionage and the life of St. Peter are Digitally Remastered

The acclaimed novel of spies, code-breaking, and intrigue in World War II Italy, by bestselling author Walter Murphy (The Vicar of Christ), is now a convenient ebook and a new paperback edition. Previously published by Macmillan and Dell, this book is now presented in a quality digital edition, including active Contents and proper formatting, as [...]

Full Story »

Classic Social Science, Digitally Remastered: The Protection of Children, Second Edition, by Dingwall, Eekelaar & Murray

This book has not been easily available in print for many years, but it has long been regarded as an important contribution to the study of child abuse and neglect, and legal and social responses to it.
This classic study of law and social work in action is based on the most extensive investigation of child [...]

Full Story »

Harvard Law Review, May 2014, on Exclusionary Rule, Opt-outs, and Financial Regulation’s Politics

Harvard Law Review, Number 7 (May 2014), includes an article, two book review essays, and extensive student research. Specifically, the issue features:
• Article, “The Due Process Exclusionary Rule,” by Richard M. Re
• Book Review, “Consent and Sensibility,” by Michelle E. Boardman
• Book Review, “The Politics of Financial Regulation and the Regulation of Financial Politics: A [...]

Full Story »

Yale Law Journal Symposium: “Federalism as the New Nationalism”; Apr. 2014 also has articles on threatening war and on counting judicial votes

The April 2014 issue of The Yale Law Journal includes an extensive Feature that explores the idea of Federalism as the New Nationalism, with contributions by Jessica Bulman-Pozen (“From Sovereignty and Process to Administration and Politics: The Afterlife of American Federalism”), Heather Gerken (“An Overview,” “The Loyal Opposition”), Abbe Gluck (“Our [National] Federalism”), Alison LaCroix [...]

Full Story »

Yale Law Journal, March 2014, Studies Shrinking Cities, Fund Managers, Moral Impact, & Pretrial Monitoring

The March 2014 issue of The Yale Law Journal features new articles and essays on law and legal theory by internationally recognized scholars. The contents for Volume 123, Number 5, include:
Articles:
The New Minimal Cities, by Michelle Wilde Anderson
The Separation of Funds and Managers: A Theory of Investment Fund Structure and Regulation, by John Morley
Essays:
The Moral [...]

Full Story »

Harvard Law Review, March 2014, challenges judicial review of agencies, adds Reviews on biracial couples, religion, and active judges

Volume 127, Number 5, features these new articles and review essays:
• Article, “The Puzzling Presumption of Reviewability,” Nicholas Bagley
• Book Review, “Making the Modern Family: Interracial Intimacy and the Social Production of Whiteness,” Camille Gear Rich 
• Book Review, “The Case for Religious Exemptions — Whether Religion Is Special or Not,” Mark L. Rienzi
• Book Review, [...]

Full Story »

David Crump’s 2014 Courtroom Thriller Pits Herrick Against a Drug Kingpin and its Bank

New from the author of CONFLICT OF INTEREST and MURDER IN SUGAR LAND: Law professor David Crump’s latest courtroom drama features Houston trial lawyer Robert Herrick, in a case that risks it all.
Herrick is the lawyer for the little guy in Houston, Texas. His courtroom experiences have been realistically recounted in David Crump’s [...]

Full Story »

John Flood’s Study of the Corporate Law Firm Reveals a Side of Law Practice Often Ignored: Inside

A legal scholar and sociologist, John Flood spent years observing a large law firm from the inside—much like an embedded journalist, but with the perspective of a researcher on the theory and practice of legal organizations. What he found and analyzed resulted in a study that has been cited by many scholars over the years [...]

Full Story »

Yale Law Journal’s Jan. 2014 No. 4: Bankruptcy, Shareholder Governance, Prosecutorial Vindictiveness, and Crowding Out Effects

The January 2014 issue of The Yale Law Journal features new articles and essays on law and legal theory by internationally recognized scholars. The contents for Volume 123, Number 4, include:
• “Ice Cube Bonds: Allocating the Price of Process in Chapter 11 Bankruptcy,” by Melissa B. Jacoby & Edward J. Janger
• “The Evolution of Shareholder [...]

Full Story »

Malcolm Feeley’s classic Court Reform on Trial on Innovation & Failure in the Criminal Process, now Digitally Remastered™

COURT REFORM ON TRIAL is a recognized study of innovation in the process of criminal justice, and why it so often fails—despite the best intentions of judges, administrators, and reformers. The arc of innovation to disappointment is analyzed for such ideas as bail reform, pretrial diversion, speedy trials, and determinate sentencing. A much-maligned system of [...]

Full Story »

Dingwall’s Social Organisation of Health Visitor Training Returns with New Preface by the Author

A book that was hard to find but much cited and well reviewed finds a new home at Quid Pro Books, in multiple digital formats, as a Digitally Remastered Book.™ Its digital edition features new material, too.
Robert Dingwall’s classic and original study of the training of health visitors (public health nurses) in the UK is [...]

Full Story »

University of Chicago Law Review, Fall 2013, studies bankruptcy, precedent, copyright, and judicial good faith, plus six Comments

The University of Chicago Law Review’s 4th and final issue, Fall 2013, features articles and essays from internationally recognized legal scholars, as well as extensive student research in the form of Comments. Contents of Volume 80, Number 4, are:
ARTICLES
• Bankruptcy Law as a Liquidity Provider, by Kenneth Ayotte & David A. Skeel Jr.
• Impeaching Precedent, [...]

Full Story »

Harvard Law Review, #2, Dec. 2013: Honoring Dworkin, ‘Lost’ Essay by Hart on Discretion, Article on Media Leaks, and Notes & Recent Cases

The December 2013 issue of the Harvard Law Review is dedicated to the memory of Ronald Dworkin, with In Memoriam essays offered by Richard Fallon, Jr., Charles Fried, John C.P. Goldberg, Frances Kamm, Frank Michelman, Martha Minow, and Laurence Tribe.
The issue features an article by David Pozen entitled “The Leaky Leviathan: Why the Government Condemns [...]

Full Story »

Yale Law Journal, Dec. 2013, Analyzes Patent “Construction,” Agencies vs. Litigation, Sexual “Tops,” and Religious Value

The third issue of The Yale Law Journal’s Volume 123 (Dec. 2013) features articles on law and legal theory by internationally recognized scholars. Contents include:
•  Article, “The Interpretation-Construction Distinction in Patent Law,” by Tun-Jen Chiang & Lawrence B. Solum
•  Article, “Agencies as Litigation Gatekeepers,” by David Freeman Engstrom
•  Essay,”Tops, Bottoms, and Versatiles: What Straight Views [...]

Full Story »

Peter Gabel’s new book Another Way of Seeing: in hardcover, paperback and eBooks

In ANOTHER WAY OF SEEING, critical legal studies scholar Peter Gabel argues that our most fundamental spiritual need as human beings is the desire for authentic mutual recognition. Because we live in a world in which this desire is systematically denied due to the legacy of fear of the other that has been passed on [...]

Full Story »

Exploring Disaster from a global and sociological perspective; new book joins the Contemporary Society Series

Legal governance of disaster brings both care and punishment to the upending of daily life of place-based disasters. National states use disasters to reorganize how they govern. The collection in Disaster and Sociolegal Studies, edited by Denver University professor Susan Sterett, considers how law is implicated in disaster. The late modern expectation that states are [...]

Full Story »

David Nelken adds new preface, and paperback and ebooks, to his award-winning study The Limits of the Legal Process

This classic and path-breaking study in the sociology of law has won multiple academic awards for its insight, clarity, and broad import in examining the UK’s Rent Acts and landlord behavior over a period of time in the 1960s and 1970s. Not just a revelation of the unintended consequences of well-meaning tenant reforms–though it certainly [...]

Full Story »

Joseph Story’s Constitutional Commentaries Returns (Hardcover, Paperback & eBook); Adds New Intro by Penn’s Kermit Roosevelt

Justice Joseph Story’s famous and influential review of the origins, influences, and early interpretations of the Constitution is now presented in the author’s own 1833 Abridged Edition—considered the most useful and readable version of this important work, written by the Supreme Court’s youngest member. No other ebook version offers the accessible [...]

Full Story »

Yale Law Journal’s first issue of Vol. 123 explores racial disparity in sentencing, gun control, unions, and special juries

This issue of The Yale Law Journal (Volume 123, No. 1, Oct. 2013) features new articles and essays on law and legal theory by internationally recognized scholars. Contents include:

• Article, “Mandatory Sentencing and Racial Disparity: Assessing the Role of Prosecutors and the Effects of Booker,” by Sonja B. Starr & M. Marit Rehavi
• Article, “Firearm [...]

Full Story »

University of Chicago Law Review’s issue 3 of 2013 explores tortfest, constitutionality, nudges and floodgates

The University of Chicago Law Review’s third issue, 2013, features articles and essays from internationally recognized legal scholars, as well as extensive student research in the form of Comments. Contents are:
ARTICLES
• Tortfest, by J. Shahar Dillbary
• Judging the Flood of Litigation, by Marin K. Levy
• Unbundling Constitutionality, by Richard Primus
• When Nudges Fail: Slippery Defaults, [...]

Full Story »

Jesse Choper’s powerful Judicial Review and the National Political Process available as an eBook

As constitutional scholar John Nowak noted when this classic book was first published, “Professor Choper’s Judicial Review and the National Political Process is mandatory reading for anyone seriously attempting to study our constitutional system of government. It is an important assessment of the democratic process and the theoretical and practical role of the Supreme Court.”
That [...]

Full Story »

Revolutionary, classic book Cybernetics: now in quality eBook, hardcover, and paperback editions

CYBERNETICS is on virtually everyone’s short list of the most important and influential nonfiction books of the last century. First published by MIT math professor Norbert Wiener in 1948, and later expanded in its Second Edition in 1961, this groundbreaking account of systems, thought processes, AI, and the use of “feedback” [...]

Full Story »

Stuart Scheingold’s Pathbreaking Study of European Integration by Law is a Digitally Remastered Book

In the early days of what would become the European Union, the new entity had a weak and ill-defined legislature and executive. And the European Court of Justice, whose decisions, actions, and even inactions subtly paved the way to a continent’s integration. “Scheingold showed that its efforts, deftly melding law and politics, were a success beyond mere dispute-resolution and development of legal doctrine,” states the new introduction to this classic study. “He was well aware that he was present at the creation of a powerful new institution. Yet he stood virtually alone in seeing what such an institution, using its power this way, could realize in terms of political integration. The resulting book was a masterpiece.”

Full Story »

Harry Scheiber’s classic study of Wilson and civil liberties is back in print … and in eBooks

The Wilson Administration and Civil Liberties, 1917-1921, is a Digitally Remastered™ reprint of one of the classic works of legal and social history. Harry Scheiber’s much-cited study of Woodrow Wilson and his cabinet explores the suppression of speech and print publication during an era of world war, the Red Scare, anti-foreign fervor, and unionism.
Wilson’s notable [...]

Full Story »
Page 1 of 212